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Crime prevention Education delivered

SUPPORTER SHOWCASE

SEW-Eurodrive

As a worldwide leading manufacturing company, SEW-Eurodrive is moving the world! Countless conveyor belts, bottling plants, gravel plants, luggage at the airport and much more would stand still without their motors, gear units, gearmotors, corresponding automation technology and range of services.

SEW-Eurodrive has been a supporter for PMGT for over 8 years now; helping us to distribute our crime prevention education to over 25,000 kiwis, informing the public on matters such as child safety, domestic violence, alcohol abuse and more as well as allowing us to fund a wide range of community support organisations and services.

Sincerely, thank you to John Hainsworth and the staff at SEW-Eurodrive for their ongoing support - from the team at NZPMGT.

GUILD NEWS

The New Zealand Police Managers’ Guild Trust are proud to have helped the NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens in reaching their financial goals to allow young Fijian boys from across the country to come together and play a game that they love whilst honouring their heritage. 

Whilst Fiji did not win (NZ Condors won both boys & girls competitions), the NZ Fijians never gave up, scoring the last try of the match through Ratu Kuli Naleisomosomo within the last minute. We are convinced there is an abundance of future Fijian stars with the team. 

The boys blasted out a note or two at the powhiri for the team which was an exceptional event in itself and the team are now taking the opportunity to review what they did well, what could have been done better, and are planning to win the title in the next edition of the World School 7’s in December 2022. We have every confidence that the boys will do an astounding job. 

‘’I therefore wanted to pass on our thanks and appreciation for the part you and the NZ Police Managers Guild Trust played in helping us. What we did would not have been possible without your very kind support. Again a big Vinaka vakalevu from our entire NZ Fiji Schools 7’s squad’’ - Inspector Jim Wilson. 

NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens

NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens Players 

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Our latest community grant, Blake Paynter was the recipient of our NZPMGT grant to assist him with advancing in the sport of rowing with a view of gaining a scholarship to study in the United States. 

In March 2021, Blake was titled the 6th fastest under-18 single scull rower in New Zealand. Following that, his rowing times and on-water speeds are alongside the fastest junior rowers in New Zealand. 

As of 19th January 2022, Blake was able to commence study at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida USA. He has received an athletic scholarship to be a part of a rowing team and is lined up to be in the stroke seat of their top eight. 

We also congratulate Blake on maintaining a high standard in his academic school work and scoring in the top 7% in his SATs. This means he has also been awarded an academic scholarship from the university and has selected to study Business for a 4-year degree.

‘’The journey to achieve this has been filled with hard work, perseverance, and cannot be achieved without the support of many people including the kind support from the New Zealand Police Managers Guild Trust. Our family would like to express that we are very thankful for the support you have given Blake and hope you can feel the same level of proudness that we feel as parents of him.  When he is racing, you can feel that you are in the boat with him and part of the team.’’ - Marc Paynter and family.

Your donations help us to continue to offer practical help to people and families wishing to reach their goals. 

Rowing athlete

Blake Paynter, New Zealand rower is a recipient of our community grants program

To see our community grants list; head here

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In 2017, the royal commission on child abuse recommended a national study on how common child abuse is. Findings revealed that 61% of those aged 16-24 said they were physically hit for discipline four or more times during their childhood.

Today, if a parent smacks a child mid-tantrum in the supermarket, they are likely to get looks of disapproval from other shoppers. Smacking is not as socially acceptable as it used to be with smacking children outlawed in NZ since 2007.

But this is not just about law reform. Raising kids can be challenging at the best of times. Kids misbehave or may not be in control of their emotions, and parents need to provide guidance to their children about what is appropriate behaviour.

The good news is there are evidence-based alternatives to smacking. These are strategies that aim to help children understand what behaviours are expected, teach them to work through their feelings and learn how to repair a situation or solve a problem.

Here are some approaches to consider with your child:

1. Give clear and consistent limits about what you expect. Children need to know how you want them to behave and for this to be clear. An example might be: “It’s not OK to hit your brother” or “You can’t take lollies off the supermarket shelves without asking me first.”

2. Manage your own emotions. Anger is contagious, so try not to lose your temper in front of your kids. Instead, pause before you react: take three deep breaths, have a cold drink of water, or step outside for a moment.

3. Explore the emotions behind behaviour. Kids can be uncertain or confused by their emotions. So, try and help them understand their feelings. This could include saying something like “I can see you felt left out and jealous”. When they are calmer, you could explore other feelings behind their actions. This is about separating feelings (jealousy, frustration) from behaviour (hitting). All feelings are okay, but not all behaviours.

4. Support children to make amends. Help them work out the solution or next step. This teaches them how to resolve situations, repair relationships and take responsibility for their behaviour. You might say something like, “It can be embarrassing saying sorry to someone you’ve been angry with. What do you think might help?”

5. Explore natural consequences. If something is broken, children might need to fix it, use pocket money to replace it, or explore what might make the situation better.

Getting discipline right is not easy as a parent. And this can be especially difficult if you were brought up with smacking (and have older relatives telling you it is “fine”).

It’s worth remembering a slogan frequently used when we talk about smacking: “children are unbeatable”. They deserve the same protection from violence as adults.

For information on positive parenting, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/child-safety/#Positive-parenting 

For the full article: 
https://theconversation.com/research-shows-its-harmful-to-smack-your-child-so-what-should-parents-do-instead-186739 

Thank you to https://www.northernsheetmetals.co.nz/ and Chan & Associates Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

#sociallyacceptable #royalcommision #antismackinglaws

In 2017, the royal commission on child abuse recommended a national study on how common child abuse is. Findings revealed that 61% of those aged 16-24 said they were physically hit for discipline four or more times during their childhood.

Today, if a parent smacks a child mid-tantrum in the supermarket, they are likely to get looks of disapproval from other shoppers. Smacking is not as socially acceptable as it used to be with smacking children outlawed in NZ since 2007.

But this is not just about law reform. Raising kids can be challenging at the best of times. Kids misbehave or may not be in control of their emotions, and parents need to provide guidance to their children about what is appropriate behaviour.

The good news is there are evidence-based alternatives to smacking. These are strategies that aim to help children understand what behaviours are expected, teach them to work through their feelings and learn how to repair a situation or solve a problem.

Here are some approaches to consider with your child:

1. Give clear and consistent limits about what you expect. Children need to know how you want them to behave and for this to be clear. An example might be: “It’s not OK to hit your brother” or “You can’t take lollies off the supermarket shelves without asking me first.”

2. Manage your own emotions. Anger is contagious, so try not to lose your temper in front of your kids. Instead, pause before you react: take three deep breaths, have a cold drink of water, or step outside for a moment.

3. Explore the emotions behind behaviour. Kids can be uncertain or confused by their emotions. So, try and help them understand their feelings. This could include saying something like “I can see you felt left out and jealous”. When they are calmer, you could explore other feelings behind their actions. This is about separating feelings (jealousy, frustration) from behaviour (hitting). All feelings are okay, but not all behaviours.

4. Support children to make amends. Help them work out the solution or next step. This teaches them how to resolve situations, repair relationships and take responsibility for their behaviour. You might say something like, “It can be embarrassing saying sorry to someone you’ve been angry with. What do you think might help?”

5. Explore natural consequences. If something is broken, children might need to fix it, use pocket money to replace it, or explore what might make the situation better.

Getting discipline right is not easy as a parent. And this can be especially difficult if you were brought up with smacking (and have older relatives telling you it is “fine”).

It’s worth remembering a slogan frequently used when we talk about smacking: “children are unbeatable”. They deserve the same protection from violence as adults.

For information on positive parenting, visit pmgt.org.nz/child-safety/#Positive-parenting

For the full article:
theconversation.com/research-shows-its-harmful-to-smack-your-child-so-what-should-parents-do-inst...

Thank you to www.northernsheetmetals.co.nz/ and Chan & Associates Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

#sociallyacceptable #royalcommision #antismackinglaws
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What that they now run around smash and grabs etc i want it to be like when my grandparents were young sounded like people and kids had way more respect

There is also evidence that refusing to use physical discipline ( a swat on the nappy is different to actual abuse) after all other options are exhausted has brought major costs to society.

Children now are running rings around their parents and the community, an undisciplined child turns out to be bully with no disregard for anything other than what they want.

R u serious???? A smack is a smack abuse is more physical and prolonged thats the difference if u think taking away a parents right to smack a child was the right thing to do this day an age then leave it be

What a joke. Go and investigate all the allegations of child abuse against children in care instead of giving it to Oranga Tamariki to investigate. Disgusting how many caregivers are getting away with it. Especially when the kids haven't been excluded from their families over physical violence against them. Professional and criminal on a massive scale.

Its how not why you smack little shits, read again

Wosnt often done my kids probbly onece they smack ass .didnt need to at end day herts feelings .love doing best love time all need kids

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When Emma Burns was delivering off-site training earlier this week, she found herself engaged in a conversation that made her reach for the tissues.  

During a break in the training program, Emma was approached by a male participant named Kahui.  He told her that he used to be President of a local Black Power chapter and spoke about a life-changing memory he had in 2015 when his son was taken from his custody with the assistance of the Police.  Kahui told Emma that once Police had left his address, he went to his garage with the intention of ending his life.  

A short time later, one of the officers who had attended came back. The officer showed a level of compassion that day that went over and above expectations and Kahui believes the officer saved his life.  

A box of tissues later and Emma was determined to track the officer down.  After touching base with a local sergeant, Constable Richard Lewis was identified as being that officer.  On Wednesday this week, Kahui and Richard were reunited with Emma on hand to catch the occasion.  

During the meet, Kahui relayed a famous line from the movie Patch Adams ‘if you focus on the problem, you can’t see the solution’ and told Richard that he felt as though he helped him focus on a solution.  “That’s what you did for me that day – you looked beyond my patch and saw me as a person”.  

Richard said he was incredibly humbled and had no idea how much of an impact his actions had on Kahui that day.  He said “there’s no doubt that all Police Officers attend similar situations with the same attitude but to have this come around seven years later is certainly humbling.  

Richard told Kahui that the credit really lies with the hard Mahi he’s done to change his life, but it’s a rewarding feeling to know that he’s contributed in some way”.  

In the last seven years, Kahui has left the gang, been free from any addiction, and works in social services helping vulnerable families find homes.  He also pastors a local church in Ngaruawahia. It’s stories like this that Emma is keen to promote to new recruits.  

She said “What we say to people can have a huge impact on them, particularly in instances of vulnerability.  Every job we attend we leave a lasting impression – whether that be good or bad and it’s really important that we are mindful of that fact.  

Emma cried about 15 times that day telling people of the situation.  ‘’There is no doubt in my mind that there are many more stories out there just like Richard and Kahui’s so it was wonderful to have the opportunity to celebrate this one”.   

www.pmgt.org.nz

#nzpolice #compassion #Ngaruawahia

When Emma Burns was delivering off-site training earlier this week, she found herself engaged in a conversation that made her reach for the tissues.

During a break in the training program, Emma was approached by a male participant named Kahui. He told her that he used to be President of a local Black Power chapter and spoke about a life-changing memory he had in 2015 when his son was taken from his custody with the assistance of the Police. Kahui told Emma that once Police had left his address, he went to his garage with the intention of ending his life.

A short time later, one of the officers who had attended came back. The officer showed a level of compassion that day that went over and above expectations and Kahui believes the officer saved his life.

A box of tissues later and Emma was determined to track the officer down. After touching base with a local sergeant, Constable Richard Lewis was identified as being that officer. On Wednesday this week, Kahui and Richard were reunited with Emma on hand to catch the occasion.

During the meet, Kahui relayed a famous line from the movie Patch Adams ‘if you focus on the problem, you can’t see the solution’ and told Richard that he felt as though he helped him focus on a solution. “That’s what you did for me that day – you looked beyond my patch and saw me as a person”.

Richard said he was incredibly humbled and had no idea how much of an impact his actions had on Kahui that day. He said “there’s no doubt that all Police Officers attend similar situations with the same attitude but to have this come around seven years later is certainly humbling.

Richard told Kahui that the credit really lies with the hard Mahi he’s done to change his life, but it’s a rewarding feeling to know that he’s contributed in some way”.

In the last seven years, Kahui has left the gang, been free from any addiction, and works in social services helping vulnerable families find homes. He also pastors a local church in Ngaruawahia. It’s stories like this that Emma is keen to promote to new recruits.

She said “What we say to people can have a huge impact on them, particularly in instances of vulnerability. Every job we attend we leave a lasting impression – whether that be good or bad and it’s really important that we are mindful of that fact.

Emma cried about 15 times that day telling people of the situation. ‘’There is no doubt in my mind that there are many more stories out there just like Richard and Kahui’s so it was wonderful to have the opportunity to celebrate this one”.

www.pmgt.org.nz

#nzpolice #compassion #Ngaruawahia
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It was such a privilege to meet Kahui and Richard, and incredible to be in the right place at the right time to be able to reconnect these two amazing humans. Will definitely forever be one of the most incredible experiences of my life!

You never know what power your words have. Once said they can never be taken back - so think carefully before you act. Be a blessing in someone’s life and not a curse

The NZ Police get a lot of s**t but the ones I've met have generally been very kind, intuitive, and so calm despite the extreme stress of the job. I hope their working conditions improve (same for nurses).

Policing at it's best.

Congratulations Emma Burns , Kahui, Richard and everyone involved. This was such an amazing story and event, and it was an honour to witness it. You are all doing such amazing work. Well done!

Don't spend time pushing people down, but take every opportunity to lift them up. We'll done to both men.

Kahui your journey empowers many, putting smiles on particular faces. Sunday TVNZ

Beautiful story, Emma Burns. YOU went above & beyond to trace down the officer and create a reunion moment. Well done!

Wow, such a positive story. Thanks for sharing 🙂

That's so great to hear of a life changing man God bless him and those people who made a difference

Hopefully this brave man has since been reunited with his son.

Nice story. Shared to Life Matters Suicide Prevention Trust

Congratulations and well done all of you.

That's awesome ❤

Great story and just enforces the fact that there are many caring police people out there . We just don’t hear about the positives very often .

Tino Arohanui Kia koutou😍🥰💖Mauri ora brother💖

ka nui te ora - awesome mahi

Stealing peoples kids can cause emotional reactions.

😭💗

You never know what a simple gesture of empathy, kindness and understanding can have on a person. He undoubtley saved Kahui without being aware. Salute to you both 🙌

That's cool. An officer who can put themselves in somebody else's shoes and show empathy and help us get our heads on straight? That thread runs through our entire police force. Seen it all the time. I can't say that about detectives because l don't have contact with that part of the police. I live in the central city and see the police in action. One situation l witnessed was a domestic on K' rd, it was more disorderly behaviour young couple fighting over the last puff of a cigarette butt. It was pretty fierce verbally but no violence. Funny for onlookers but nicotine is a priority for smokers. If you can't get it it can be a trigger for anger.cause unnecessary arguments and even violence. An officer standing by peeled off to ask a guy who was smoking if he had a couple spare. The guy did and he gave the couple one each. The change in their behaviour was instant couple of puffs later and they were all smiles and apologies and off they went. The officer l identified the problem and found a solution that helped. Maybe he smoked once and recognised nicotine withdrawals and how it makes you grumpy and angry. Maybe he was just insightful, who knows. Just know that our police are receiving good training and it shows, they flex their discretion if they can and it makes a positive impression on the public. Love it. I want our police officers to be safe out there, l think it really helps if the public aren't afraid of the police other than the usual oh no reaction we all get when when pulled over for a traffic offence 🙂

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The Ministry of Social Development has released reports on Child and Youth offending patterns in New Zealand. The key findings were as follows:

▪️An estimated one in twenty New Zealand children are known to Police for offending before reaching 14 years of age. 

▪️Boys are twice as likely as girls to offend as children. 

▪️Māori children are approximately three times more likely than non-Māori children to become known to Police as an offender by age 14.

▪️A complex interplay of risk factors leads to Māori children, both boys, and girls, being apprehended at a greater rate than children from other ethnic groups. 

▪️Broadly, attention needs to focus on two areas. Firstly, the rate of Māori children offending and entering the youth justice system in the first instance needs to be reduced. Secondly, for those children who do come in contact with the system, there need to be effective interventions to increase the likelihood that they do not re-offend.

New Zealand has seen a drop in youth crime rates within the last year, however the reasons for the fall are unclear and therefore subject to debate says the Ministry of Justice. 

The latest Youth Justice Indicators Summary Report revealing offending rates among tamariki aged 10 to 13 fell by 65% between 2010/11 and 2020/21.

Despite this drop, there has still been a spike in ramraids across Auckland over the last few months such as most recently, a child as young as 7 caught stealing from a Hamilton shopping centre at early hours in the morning. 

For information on positive parenting, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/child-safety/#Positive-parenting 

For information on preventing workplace theft, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/safer-communities/#prevention-in-the-workplace 

Thank you to Flooring Design and http://wisheartmacnab.co.nz for sponsoring our organisation!

#youthoffendingnz #MinistryofSocialDevelopment #youthcrimeratesnz

The Ministry of Social Development has released reports on Child and Youth offending patterns in New Zealand. The key findings were as follows:

▪️An estimated one in twenty New Zealand children are known to Police for offending before reaching 14 years of age.

▪️Boys are twice as likely as girls to offend as children.

▪️Māori children are approximately three times more likely than non-Māori children to become known to Police as an offender by age 14.

▪️A complex interplay of risk factors leads to Māori children, both boys, and girls, being apprehended at a greater rate than children from other ethnic groups.

▪️Broadly, attention needs to focus on two areas. Firstly, the rate of Māori children offending and entering the youth justice system in the first instance needs to be reduced. Secondly, for those children who do come in contact with the system, there need to be effective interventions to increase the likelihood that they do not re-offend.

New Zealand has seen a drop in youth crime rates within the last year, however the reasons for the fall are unclear and therefore subject to debate says the Ministry of Justice.

The latest Youth Justice Indicators Summary Report revealing offending rates among tamariki aged 10 to 13 fell by 65% between 2010/11 and 2020/21.

Despite this drop, there has still been a spike in ramraids across Auckland over the last few months such as most recently, a child as young as 7 caught stealing from a Hamilton shopping centre at early hours in the morning.

For information on positive parenting, visit pmgt.org.nz/child-safety/#Positive-parenting

For information on preventing workplace theft, visit pmgt.org.nz/safer-communities/#prevention-in-the-workplace

Thank you to Flooring Design and wisheartmacnab.co.nz for sponsoring our organisation!

#youthoffendingnz #MinistryofSocialDevelopment #youthcrimeratesnz
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The problem with statistics is that they can be juggled to suit whatever is trying to be proven. As with many other things there are always three sides to statistics, his, hers and the truth. The reason more Maori become known to the police at such an early age is because there are more of them breaking the law. Possibly this is due to peer pressure or simply because they are being raised in a home where drink, drugs and lawlessness is an every day occurrence. Either way, that is why there are more Maori in prison that Europeans, not because of racism as is so often stated.

It’s about time parents were charged for their lack of control and parenting skills then educated on acceptable behaviour

Please also give some focus to children with learning disabilities, FASD, ADD/ADHD, ASD etc that are not supported in schools or communities. Their whānau/carers are often very isolated (and judged) and because some neurological differences are genetic, may also be struggling. Thank you

What is a 7 yr old doing out of the house at that hour of the morning

I would like to know the genesis of this youth offending. I know that single unemployed adults already in abuse abusing drugs alcohol in violence use this negative base to have children. Is the welfare system a catastrophic failure to the adults who start families this way and to all their children. When is society going to recognize that money given in this way is NOT the answer. Children are being used as security for adults who are never ever going to face their responsibilities, mature right, be sober, work, treat themselves and their children as valued priceless cared for .

this is disgraceful so many young violent offenders. these kids are supposed to be the next generation running the country

It just goes to show the parents don't love their kids, or they just don't care, what their little darlings are up too!

where are the parents

How to support and encourage them to change their direction? Whatever their home situations, they can choose to do wrong or right, but some don't know how to handle their emotions. Not every young offender comes from a "bad" home. So what to do? I do think first of all they need a good fright, and adult crimes by young and adult, need tough sentences, but the young ones need more than that so they don't ruin the rest of their lives. Boot camp or something like that could be a part of rehabilitation for them?

Comes back to parenting or the lack of it

What is wrong with these kids, where are their parents? The kids know the law and know that there are no consequences for their behavior, time both Governments got off their backsides and started to toughen up on outdated laws. It is a total disgrace, this country is a soft touch. Years ago there used to be a boot camp for wayward kids that were sent there to learn to behave and respect others and their property, seems it needs to re established. Outdated soft laws have created out of control kids and also adults.

Watch the documentary 'WHY Am I' based on the 50 year, onging, 'Dunedin Study'. All the answers to a lot of these questions are within it. Its findings are world renowned. ITS FROM OTAGO UNIVERSITY DUNEDIN. NZ. Why then, in our progessive society, are things cotinuing to grow worse instead of improving?

I personally do not believe youth crime has reduced. From my perspective it has increased but Police tend to not bother reacting because they know that the amount of time and effort they put in to apprehension and paperwork is just rewarded with a slap on the hand by a soft approach judiciary system

note: "subject to debate" doesn't mean "insert biased opinion based on incomplete data and poor comprehension" If you think you know what is wrong in society and can describe this in a couple of sentences, you're probably far from understanding the issue. Realistic solutions aren't about right or wrong, rather, deciding where you make compromises.

Some run away from home is to do their own thing they want to be, not listening to the parents.

Don’t believe stats it’s too easy to manufacture the results to suit the group running the survey.

Struggling is the other reason, neglected, or orphanage none out there for them to reach out to.

A lot of gangs use children as they do not do the hard time that adults do.

The other 19 gave false names

So very sad why wish I knew

Maori children just don't do as well as others in the current school system. It's not just parents and family failing, it's society and the school system. Maori children need to be taught in a setting with te ao Maori values where their strengths are recognized, where their tupuna are acknowledged and their whaanau are acknowledged as important people to their child's learning, an environment where maori are valued and with a curriculum with more hands on learning especially outdoors. Our wairua our mauri our mana are diminished the moment we are expected to sit at a desk all day with a paper and pen listening to a teacher with their back turned to us while they write on a board. Maori don't learn well like that. Then the schools go and decide to get chrome books which alot of whanau can't afford so what then happens, the kids who don't have chrome books are embarrassed , they are worried about getting in trouble because 9 times out of 10 you can garuntee children without chromebooks get a hard time so they stop going to school. But sports days, athletics , cross country, rugby, league, netball, pretty much every sport, all the physical ed stuff Maori children carve up, woodwork, art, singing, dance kapahaka, swimming, Maori thrive. So instead of discipline and trying to conform them to fit in , instead of punishing them, change the way education is delivered to them. Provide the curriculum in a way Maaori can be succesful. Where are the teachers who want to uplift them?

And they know under 20 years laws are weak and no penalties for assault t orr killing someone they can walk free

No suprise here

Ram raiders know that police over streched under staffed and the penalties are very very weak iff caught

colonisation and intergenerational poverty and before any middleclass well fed person starts raving on the evidence over centuries demonstrates a clear link between crime and poverty. Let's address poverty first.

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A new study on The effects on Children’s Emotional, Social and Cognitive Development, produced by Koi Tū: The Centre for Informed Futures at the University of Auckland, released up-to-date national and international research about the effects of recreational screen time on children’s development.

It includes watching television, using social media platforms, and playing games but excludes screen time used for education in class or homework.

The authors say the effects of non-educational screen time on children’s brain and behavioural development are complex and depend on many factors, including the type of screen activity, the level of engagement by caregivers, and if the content is age appropriate.

The Ministry of Health recommendations for children’s recreational screen time suggest zero use for children under two years of age, less than one hour per day for children aged two to five, and less than two hours per day for children aged five to 17.

Yet 2019/20 New Zealand Health Survey reports that 88 per cent of children aged from under one to 14 exceed the guidelines. Excessive recreational screen time increases with age, with approximately 60 per cent of two to four-year-olds, 80 per cent of five to nine-year-olds, and over 90 per cent of 10 to 14-year-olds watching screens for more than two hours per day.

Dr Low says studies of teenagers have linked excessive social media and internet use with poor mental wellbeing, impaired cognition and sleep disturbances.

New screen time guidelines published by Koi Tū include:

📱Discuss the pitfalls of social media with adolescents, such as the potential for cyberbullying and the unrealistic editing of images. Check-in with teens regularly and be vigilant for any mood changes.

📱Avoid passive screen time for children under two years of age. Caregivers must be mindful of their own device use and whether interrupts adult-child interaction.

📱Choosing educational content for preschool-aged children and joining in with their viewing whenever possible.

📱Monitoring the content older children are exposed to, particularly with adult-rated movies and games, investigating parental controls on devices, and prioritising interactive screen time such as computer use over more passive options such as television.

📱Encouraging and role modelling a balance between screen time and other activities. Place limitations around screens where needed, for example, no screen use near bedtime and no devices in bedrooms.

📱Discuss the pitfalls of social media with adolescents, such as the potential for cyberbullying and the unrealistic editing of images. Check-in with teens regularly and be vigilant for any mood changes.

For more information on online safety for your kids, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/online-safety/ 

For the full report, visit https://informedfutures.org/screen-time/ 

Thank you to Reillys Towage and Adstaff Personnel Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

#cognitivedevelopment #universityofauckland #recreationalscreentime

A new study on The effects on Children’s Emotional, Social and Cognitive Development, produced by Koi Tū: The Centre for Informed Futures at the University of Auckland, released up-to-date national and international research about the effects of recreational screen time on children’s development.

It includes watching television, using social media platforms, and playing games but excludes screen time used for education in class or homework.

The authors say the effects of non-educational screen time on children’s brain and behavioural development are complex and depend on many factors, including the type of screen activity, the level of engagement by caregivers, and if the content is age appropriate.

The Ministry of Health recommendations for children’s recreational screen time suggest zero use for children under two years of age, less than one hour per day for children aged two to five, and less than two hours per day for children aged five to 17.

Yet 2019/20 New Zealand Health Survey reports that 88 per cent of children aged from under one to 14 exceed the guidelines. Excessive recreational screen time increases with age, with approximately 60 per cent of two to four-year-olds, 80 per cent of five to nine-year-olds, and over 90 per cent of 10 to 14-year-olds watching screens for more than two hours per day.

Dr Low says studies of teenagers have linked excessive social media and internet use with poor mental wellbeing, impaired cognition and sleep disturbances.

New screen time guidelines published by Koi Tū include:

📱Discuss the pitfalls of social media with adolescents, such as the potential for cyberbullying and the unrealistic editing of images. Check-in with teens regularly and be vigilant for any mood changes.

📱Avoid passive screen time for children under two years of age. Caregivers must be mindful of their own device use and whether interrupts adult-child interaction.

📱Choosing educational content for preschool-aged children and joining in with their viewing whenever possible.

📱Monitoring the content older children are exposed to, particularly with adult-rated movies and games, investigating parental controls on devices, and prioritising interactive screen time such as computer use over more passive options such as television.

📱Encouraging and role modelling a balance between screen time and other activities. Place limitations around screens where needed, for example, no screen use near bedtime and no devices in bedrooms.

📱Discuss the pitfalls of social media with adolescents, such as the potential for cyberbullying and the unrealistic editing of images. Check-in with teens regularly and be vigilant for any mood changes.

For more information on online safety for your kids, visit pmgt.org.nz/online-safety/

For the full report, visit informedfutures.org/screen-time/

Thank you to Reillys Towage and Adstaff Personnel Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

#cognitivedevelopment #universityofauckland #recreationalscreentime
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In October 2019, DBreweries set out to explore Kiwi attitudes and behaviours towards drinking and driving in a nationwide online survey of 500 drivers over 18. The study also aimed to set a benchmark for the number of people who drink any amount of alcohol and then drive.

The study found that 73% of registered drivers drink alcohol and that 20% of this group had driven within two hours of drinking alcohol in the 14 days prior to taking the survey. 

Most drivers (73%) who drink alcohol were confident that they understood the drink driving laws in New Zealand, however only 22% knew the legal adult blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit. 

This research showed that instead of thinking about blood alcohol content, people found it easier to consider the ‘number of drinks’ they were allowed before they get behind the wheel. 

The average driver feels they can safely drink 1.8 drinks and drive. ‘Drinking drivers’ on average believe they can safely drink 2.8 drinks and then drive. 

This is problematic because many factors contribute to an individual’s blood alcohol concentration level, so it’s impossible to base your choice to drive on the number of drinks you consume.

The study also showed that there is no such thing as a typical drink driver, and people who drink and then drive come from all age groups, income levels and ethnicities, and are equally likely to live in an urban, provincial or rural area. They are more likely to be men, but four in ten drink drivers in the last 14 days were women (59% of ‘drinking drivers’ were men and 41% were women).

We could all take the time to inform ourselves on drink driving by visiting https://pmgt.org.nz/alcohol-abuse/#Drink-driving.

For free 24/7 available alcohol helplines, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/directory/ 

Thank you to ROVA Chartered Accountants and Bay Power Engineering Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

#kiwiattitudes #drinkdrivingnz #bloodAlcoholContent

In October 2019, DBreweries set out to explore Kiwi attitudes and behaviours towards drinking and driving in a nationwide online survey of 500 drivers over 18. The study also aimed to set a benchmark for the number of people who drink any amount of alcohol and then drive.

The study found that 73% of registered drivers drink alcohol and that 20% of this group had driven within two hours of drinking alcohol in the 14 days prior to taking the survey.

Most drivers (73%) who drink alcohol were confident that they understood the drink driving laws in New Zealand, however only 22% knew the legal adult blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit.

This research showed that instead of thinking about blood alcohol content, people found it easier to consider the ‘number of drinks’ they were allowed before they get behind the wheel.

The average driver feels they can safely drink 1.8 drinks and drive. ‘Drinking drivers’ on average believe they can safely drink 2.8 drinks and then drive.

This is problematic because many factors contribute to an individual’s blood alcohol concentration level, so it’s impossible to base your choice to drive on the number of drinks you consume.

The study also showed that there is no such thing as a typical drink driver, and people who drink and then drive come from all age groups, income levels and ethnicities, and are equally likely to live in an urban, provincial or rural area. They are more likely to be men, but four in ten drink drivers in the last 14 days were women (59% of ‘drinking drivers’ were men and 41% were women).

We could all take the time to inform ourselves on drink driving by visiting pmgt.org.nz/alcohol-abuse/#Drink-driving.

For free 24/7 available alcohol helplines, visit pmgt.org.nz/directory/

Thank you to ROVA Chartered Accountants and Bay Power Engineering Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

#kiwiattitudes #drinkdrivingnz #bloodAlcoholContent
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Not particularly helpful! Body weight, food, standard drinks, time, If you want to reduce DD stats, best to give some guidelines perhaps.

Just don't drink and drive !!

Yep kiwi drivers worse thzn the French in paris and the romans in Rome

Chicanes. Raised platforms on an urban Street. Tawa, I think.

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