$0
Donated to assist victims of crime
0
Crime prevention Education delivered

SUPPORTER SHOWCASE

SEW-Eurodrive

As a worldwide leading manufacturing company, SEW-Eurodrive is moving the world! Countless conveyor belts, bottling plants, gravel plants, luggage at the airport and much more would stand still without their motors, gear units, gearmotors, corresponding automation technology and range of services.

SEW-Eurodrive has been a supporter for PMGT for over 8 years now; helping us to distribute our crime prevention education to over 25,000 kiwis, informing the public on matters such as child safety, domestic violence, alcohol abuse and more as well as allowing us to fund a wide range of community support organisations and services.

Sincerely, thank you to John Hainsworth and the staff at SEW-Eurodrive for their ongoing support - from the team at NZPMGT.

GUILD NEWS

The New Zealand Police Managers’ Guild Trust are proud to have helped the NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens in reaching their financial goals to allow young Fijian boys from across the country to come together and play a game that they love whilst honouring their heritage. 

Whilst Fiji did not win (NZ Condors won both boys & girls competitions), the NZ Fijians never gave up, scoring the last try of the match through Ratu Kuli Naleisomosomo within the last minute. We are convinced there is an abundance of future Fijian stars with the team. 

The boys blasted out a note or two at the powhiri for the team which was an exceptional event in itself and the team are now taking the opportunity to review what they did well, what could have been done better, and are planning to win the title in the next edition of the World School 7’s in December 2022. We have every confidence that the boys will do an astounding job. 

‘’I therefore wanted to pass on our thanks and appreciation for the part you and the NZ Police Managers Guild Trust played in helping us. What we did would not have been possible without your very kind support. Again a big Vinaka vakalevu from our entire NZ Fiji Schools 7’s squad’’ - Inspector Jim Wilson. 

NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens

NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens Players 

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Our latest community grant, Blake Paynter was the recipient of our NZPMGT grant to assist him with advancing in the sport of rowing with a view of gaining a scholarship to study in the United States. 

In March 2021, Blake was titled the 6th fastest under-18 single scull rower in New Zealand. Following that, his rowing times and on-water speeds are alongside the fastest junior rowers in New Zealand. 

As of 19th January 2022, Blake was able to commence study at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida USA. He has received an athletic scholarship to be a part of a rowing team and is lined up to be in the stroke seat of their top eight. 

We also congratulate Blake on maintaining a high standard in his academic school work and scoring in the top 7% in his SATs. This means he has also been awarded an academic scholarship from the university and has selected to study Business for a 4-year degree.

‘’The journey to achieve this has been filled with hard work, perseverance, and cannot be achieved without the support of many people including the kind support from the New Zealand Police Managers Guild Trust. Our family would like to express that we are very thankful for the support you have given Blake and hope you can feel the same level of proudness that we feel as parents of him.  When he is racing, you can feel that you are in the boat with him and part of the team.’’ - Marc Paynter and family.

Your donations help us to continue to offer practical help to people and families wishing to reach their goals. 

Rowing athlete

Blake Paynter, New Zealand rower is a recipient of our community grants program

To see our community grants list; head here

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Want to play the Awatoto Napier Golf Course? NZ Police Managers’ Guild Trust is giving away 4 free rounds of golf valued at $192!

If golf isnt your thing, you can opt for a round of footgolf - a game played on a golf course in which a football is kicked into a series of large holes, the object being to complete the course using the fewest possible shots.

There are 4 vouchers to be won with each voucher allowing you to bring up to 4 people so you can bring along your family and friends for a day out! 

Awatoto Golf Course has:

- 18 and 9 hole golf courses.
- Lounge seating up to 160, with views over the course. Bar and Café.
- Golf shop stocking a selection of clubs, balls, clothing, drinks, and snacks.
  club sets.
- Club, trundler and cart hires.
- Driving nets.
- Full Mens and Ladies shower facilities and locker rooms.
- Credit card and EFTPOS facilities.
- Lockers and club storage.
- Club, trundler, and cart hires.

To enter the giveaway:

Comment = 1 entry
Tagging a friend = 2 entrys
Sharing to your page or story = 2 entrys 

The more comments and shares, the more entrys. 

Giveaway ends 10th June, goodluck!
https://www.maraenuigolf.co.nz/

Want to play the Awatoto Napier Golf Course? NZ Police Managers’ Guild Trust is giving away 4 free rounds of golf valued at $192!

If golf isn't your thing, you can opt for a round of footgolf - a game played on a golf course in which a football is kicked into a series of large holes, the object being to complete the course using the fewest possible shots.

There are 4 vouchers to be won with each voucher allowing you to bring up to 4 people so you can bring along your family and friends for a day out!

Awatoto Golf Course has:

- 18 and 9 hole golf courses.
- Lounge seating up to 160, with views over the course. Bar and Café.
- Golf shop stocking a selection of clubs, balls, clothing, drinks, and snacks.
club sets.
- Club, trundler and cart hires.
- Driving nets.
- Full Men's and Ladies' shower facilities and locker rooms.
- Credit card and EFTPOS facilities.
- Lockers and club storage.
- Club, trundler, and cart hires.

To enter the giveaway:

Comment = 1 entry
Tagging a friend = 2 entrys
Sharing to your page or story = 2 entrys

The more comments and shares, the more entrys.

Giveaway ends 10th June, goodluck!
www.maraenuigolf.co.nz/
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Glorious golf

Sherril Lawrence

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Australia’s No Excuse Needed video campaign aimed to drive culture change by challenging perceived social norms around drinking.

Research by VicHealth showed that 61% of young people don’t go out intending to get drunk.

So while the majority of young people aren’t actually drinking to get drunk, they often feel pressure from others to drink more than they intended.

We urge young people to think about why they make up excuses but also question if and why they put pressure on others to drink in an attempt to reduce the importance alcohol plays in young Kiwis' lives.

Need support with alcohol abuse? Visit our directory to find free, nationwide support services pmgt.org.nz/directory/#drugs-&-alcohol-directory or visit our alcohol abuse webpage at pmgt.org.nz/alcohol-abuse/ for information and resources.

Thank you to the team at www.thewillowshome.com and DHMC for sponsoring our organisation!
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If your planning on getting drunk. It's cheaper at home. Use less gas. Require's no taxi and alcohol is cheaper at the liquor store. Same result and you save a lot of money.

most of the naughty boy stuff was done when alcohol was consumed for me. A few run ins with the law mostly as i said when drinking

When peoples mental health problems reach a crisis point, they frequently seek help but the wait times for counselling or specialist care vary. Surveys have found that some private counsellors who had appointments available in a matter of days. Most, however, had to wait one to two weeks. Others would have to wait at least two to three months to see a new client.

The 2018 Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction report highlighted long wait times, particularly for public care. According to the enquiry panel, a lack of available services (such as talk therapy) overburdened specialist services, including inpatient facilities, and resulted in an over-reliance on medication.

ACC-registered sexual violence counsellors typically had wait times of several months, surveys found. The agency said clients spend an average of seven weeks on a wait list, according to data from its support organisations. This was down from eight weeks in 2017, despite a steady increase in the number of claims.

ACC chief customer officer Emma Powell said: “Everyone working in the sector agrees current wait times need to improve. They have made some changes to our service requirements, such as enabling psychology interns and providers, with the appropriate qualifications, to provide support under close supervision and mentoring.

“We are continuing to focus efforts on meeting the growing demand for therapy providers but one of the challenges is that trauma therapy for sexual violence is a highly skilled profession, which requires years of study and work experience.”

If you find yourself faced with a long wait, you have options. Ask your GP if the practice offers in-house counselling or a rapid intervention service. Some counsellors run a wait list – allowing you to pick up an appointment at short notice if another client reschedules.

The helplines can provide an immediate source of support. Although these phone services can’t replicate in-person counselling, they may provide a much-needed ear and advice if you’re facing a lengthy wait.

Employee assistance programmes typically have shorter wait times. However, only the first few sessions will be funded – though extensions are possible (depending on your employer). After that, the counsellor might be able to take you as a patient but it’s likely to be on your dime.

Ms Macfarlane said seeking help through multiple avenues (for example, through employee assistance and publicly funded services) often comes at the cost of switching counsellors – a difficult task, if you’ve bonded with the first and need to start building that relationship again.

The 2019 Budget included an extra $1.9 billion for mental health over four years. Some of this cash will establish a new service putting mental health workers into doctors’ clinics, iwi health providers and health services. Suicide prevention, addiction treatment and the nurses in school schemes also received a boost.

But as services have been long underfunded, experts, including Mr Robinson, said the extra money only allowed existing services to “catch up” with current demand, rather than providing the cash required for new initiatives. Although very supportive of the budget funding, Mr Robinson said further and ongoing investment was necessary.

Thank you to the team at http://www.capellaconsulting.co.nz and Chan & Associates Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!

When people's mental health problems reach a crisis point, they frequently seek help but the wait times for counselling or specialist care vary. Surveys have found that some private counsellors who had appointments available in a matter of days. Most, however, had to wait one to two weeks. Others would have to wait at least two to three months to see a new client.

The 2018 Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction report highlighted long wait times, particularly for public care. According to the enquiry panel, a lack of available services (such as talk therapy) overburdened specialist services, including inpatient facilities, and resulted in an over-reliance on medication.

ACC-registered sexual violence counsellors typically had wait times of several months, surveys found. The agency said clients spend an average of seven weeks on a wait list, according to data from its support organisations. This was down from eight weeks in 2017, despite a steady increase in the number of claims.

ACC chief customer officer Emma Powell said: “Everyone working in the sector agrees current wait times need to improve. They have made some changes to our service requirements, such as enabling psychology interns and providers, with the appropriate qualifications, to provide support under close supervision and mentoring.

“We are continuing to focus efforts on meeting the growing demand for therapy providers but one of the challenges is that trauma therapy for sexual violence is a highly skilled profession, which requires years of study and work experience.”

If you find yourself faced with a long wait, you have options. Ask your GP if the practice offers in-house counselling or a rapid intervention service. Some counsellors run a wait list – allowing you to pick up an appointment at short notice if another client reschedules.

The helplines can provide an immediate source of support. Although these phone services can’t replicate in-person counselling, they may provide a much-needed ear and advice if you’re facing a lengthy wait.

Employee assistance programmes typically have shorter wait times. However, only the first few sessions will be funded – though extensions are possible (depending on your employer). After that, the counsellor might be able to take you as a patient but it’s likely to be on your dime.

Ms Macfarlane said seeking help through multiple avenues (for example, through employee assistance and publicly funded services) often comes at the cost of switching counsellors – a difficult task, if you’ve bonded with the first and need to start building that relationship again.

The 2019 Budget included an extra $1.9 billion for mental health over four years. Some of this cash will establish a new service putting mental health workers into doctors’ clinics, iwi health providers and health services. Suicide prevention, addiction treatment and the nurses in school schemes also received a boost.

But as services have been long underfunded, experts, including Mr Robinson, said the extra money only allowed existing services to “catch up” with current demand, rather than providing the cash required for new initiatives. Although very supportive of the budget funding, Mr Robinson said further and ongoing investment was necessary.

Thank you to the team at www.capellaconsulting.co.nz and Chan & Associates Ltd for sponsoring our organisation!
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Wait times when you are desperate make people in need sicker. I applaud the changes that have been made in the last few years with the addition of the phone service 1737. I am confident that must be helping some people. I also believe that local GPs and Medical Centres are possibly now taking more of the load (which is also not good for their health)... we can all put our hands up and be their for our friends and loved ones. If you are suffering do not be afraid to ask for help.

That is so disgusting, poor people who sometimes don’t make it that long for help. 😩

Long overdue

Video image

Parents can’t afford to ignore the pressures their children face to try drugs and alcohol. From school hallways to social media to pop culture, your child lives in a world that encourages substance use.

If you suspect that your child may be using alcohol or drugs, don’t wait. Not sure what to do next? A great place to start is talking to one of the free 24/7 available helplines on our directory at pmgt.org.nz/directory/. Or get the information you need to address your son or daughter's substance use with our Teen Safety, Alcohol Abuse, or Drug Abuse webpages at pmgt.org.nz/.

www.addictionisreal.org/dont-wait#download

Thank you to Plains Irrigators and Aotea Group for sponsoring our organisation!

#childsafety #childsafetyawareness
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Is it just me or has alcohol become tabo to talk about. It's ok to teach your teens to drink in moderation. Preferably if they are 16+. It'll raise a few questions if your giving your 11 year old alcohol.

I could tell she was asking for it…. to stop, so I stepped in and told my friend to back off.

The messages apply to people of all ages, not just children. They are, however, especially relevant for young people, who are among the most vulnerable to sexual assault. According to the most recent NZ Crime and Victims Survey, 1 in 11 girls aged 15-19 have been sexually assaulted in the previous 12 months, which is four times the national average!

Furthermore, Aviva research conducted in 2021 on sexual harm support available for youth revealed that more needs to be done in the area of education. We must do better for our youth, and prevention begins with changing young peoples perceptions.

It is not enough to simply recite statistics; many people may already be aware that 35% of women and 12% of men will experience sexual assault in their lifetime (although research tells us that assaults are under-reported, particularly for men) and that the rape conviction rate in this country is around 10%.

Such information is only useful if people are aware that they can take action. Without action, awareness can lead to feelings of hopelessness and a lack of faith in change.

Our friend was all over some stranger, so we left… but we made sure our mate came with us; they were too wasted to be left alone.

They were acting all sweet, offering them a ride… but it didn’t feel right, so we stepped in and got them out of there.

“There’s a strong tendency in society to feel like you should mind your own business, or that something’s not our problem. Even with the best intentions, we might be guilty of it – and that’s not anyone’s fault, it’s often how we were raised and how we’re conditioned. This campaign gives people permission to go with their gut if something doesn’t look, or feel, right. Sometimes people just need that reminder that they can be the difference.” - Jo.

You can be the difference.

Campaign by Aviva at https://www.avivafamilies.org.nz/Avivas-Blog/preventing-sexual-harm-you-can-be-the-difference/ 

Thank you to Kilbirnie Unichem Pharmacy and http://www.rdtpacific.co.nz for sponsoring our organisation!

I could tell she was asking for it…. to stop, so I stepped in and told my friend to back off.

The messages apply to people of all ages, not just children. They are, however, especially relevant for young people, who are among the most vulnerable to sexual assault. According to the most recent NZ Crime and Victims Survey, 1 in 11 girls aged 15-19 have been sexually assaulted in the previous 12 months, which is four times the national average!

Furthermore, Aviva research conducted in 2021 on sexual harm support available for youth revealed that more needs to be done in the area of education. We must do better for our youth, and prevention begins with changing young people's perceptions.

It is not enough to simply recite statistics; many people may already be aware that 35% of women and 12% of men will experience sexual assault in their lifetime (although research tells us that assaults are under-reported, particularly for men) and that the rape conviction rate in this country is around 10%.

Such information is only useful if people are aware that they can take action. Without action, awareness can lead to feelings of hopelessness and a lack of faith in change.

Our friend was all over some stranger, so we left… but we made sure our mate came with us; they were too wasted to be left alone.

They were acting all sweet, offering them a ride… but it didn’t feel right, so we stepped in and got them out of there.

“There’s a strong tendency in society to feel like you should mind your own business, or that something’s not our problem. Even with the best intentions, we might be guilty of it – and that’s not anyone’s fault, it’s often how we were raised and how we’re conditioned. This campaign gives people permission to go with their gut if something doesn’t look, or feel, right. Sometimes people just need that reminder that they can be the difference.” - Jo.

You can be the difference.

Campaign by Aviva at www.avivafamilies.org.nz/Avivas-Blog/preventing-sexual-harm-you-can-be-the-difference/

Thank you to Kilbirnie Unichem Pharmacy and www.rdtpacific.co.nz for sponsoring our organisation!
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Please always ask someone, even a stranger if they are alright. If you think something is wrong there is a high chance you could be right. Even if it is you in the position of feeling uncomfortable.... go with your Gut & seek help or move away from the situation. Don't hang around to find out. Please also remember to call 111 in an emergency.

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