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Crime prevention Education delivered
FAREWELL BRIAN HARTLEY 
Brian Hartley

Retired Police Superintendent Brian Hartley left us suddenly, aged 84, on 14 August 2022. The team here at the Police Managers' Guild Trust would like to extend our most sincere condolences to Brian's Family, Friends, Colleagues and anyone lucky enough to have known him. 

Brian was the Driving Force behind the formation of the PMGT in 1997, a Trustee since the PMGT was formed and was elected a Life Member in 2019.

Under his careful and diligent guidance, the PMGT has donated over $3,500,000 to the victims of crime and produced education to benefit millions of Kiwis.

Brian's extraordinary example and legacy is one that will further motivate us to stop crime and save lives.

SUPPORTER SHOWCASE

SEW-Eurodrive

As a worldwide leading manufacturing company, SEW-Eurodrive is moving the world! Countless conveyor belts, bottling plants, gravel plants, luggage at the airport and much more would stand still without their motors, gear units, gearmotors, corresponding automation technology and range of services.

SEW-Eurodrive has been a supporter for PMGT for over 8 years now; helping us to distribute our crime prevention education to over 25,000 kiwis, informing the public on matters such as child safety, domestic violence, alcohol abuse and more as well as allowing us to fund a wide range of community support organisations and services.

Sincerely, thank you to John Hainsworth and the staff at SEW-Eurodrive for their ongoing support - from the team at NZPMGT.

GUILD NEWS

The New Zealand Police Managers’ Guild Trust are proud to have helped the NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens in reaching their financial goals to allow young Fijian boys from across the country to come together and play a game that they love whilst honouring their heritage. 

Whilst Fiji did not win (NZ Condors won both boys & girls competitions), the NZ Fijians never gave up, scoring the last try of the match through Ratu Kuli Naleisomosomo within the last minute. We are convinced there is an abundance of future Fijian stars with the team. 

The boys blasted out a note or two at the powhiri for the team which was an exceptional event in itself and the team are now taking the opportunity to review what they did well, what could have been done better, and are planning to win the title in the next edition of the World School 7’s in December 2022. We have every confidence that the boys will do an astounding job. 

‘’I therefore wanted to pass on our thanks and appreciation for the part you and the NZ Police Managers Guild Trust played in helping us. What we did would not have been possible without your very kind support. Again a big Vinaka vakalevu from our entire NZ Fiji Schools 7’s squad’’ - Inspector Jim Wilson. 

NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens

NZ Fiji Schools Rugby Sevens Players 

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Our latest community grant, Blake Paynter was the recipient of our NZPMGT grant to assist him with advancing in the sport of rowing with a view of gaining a scholarship to study in the United States. 

In March 2021, Blake was titled the 6th fastest under-18 single scull rower in New Zealand. Following that, his rowing times and on-water speeds are alongside the fastest junior rowers in New Zealand. 

As of 19th January 2022, Blake was able to commence study at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida USA. He has received an athletic scholarship to be a part of a rowing team and is lined up to be in the stroke seat of their top eight. 

We also congratulate Blake on maintaining a high standard in his academic school work and scoring in the top 7% in his SATs. This means he has also been awarded an academic scholarship from the university and has selected to study Business for a 4-year degree.

‘’The journey to achieve this has been filled with hard work, perseverance, and cannot be achieved without the support of many people including the kind support from the New Zealand Police Managers Guild Trust. Our family would like to express that we are very thankful for the support you have given Blake and hope you can feel the same level of proudness that we feel as parents of him.  When he is racing, you can feel that you are in the boat with him and part of the team.’’ - Marc Paynter and family.

Your donations help us to continue to offer practical help to people and families wishing to reach their goals. 

Rowing athlete

Blake Paynter, New Zealand rower is a recipient of our community grants program

To see our community grants list; head here

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Suicide is the leading cause of death during pregnancy and the postnatal period, and Māori women are three times more likely to die this way, a new report has found.Up to half of all birthing parents experience symptoms of perinatal distress and this has long-lasting consequences, report author Holly Walker said.Walker said stress, anxiety, and depression has long-lasting consequences for both parents and babies.Having a parent in distress can also cause serious detrimental impacts for babies that can hinder their cognitive, emotional, and physiological development.The evidence indicates that support works best when it comes from sources that parents already know and trust, and that community-led and kaupapa Māori driven initiatives can be especially effective.This would help break the cycle of intergenerational disadvantage.If you or someone you know is pregnant or expecting a child, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/mental-health/#Depression for information on postnatal depression and how to seek help.Article by RNZThank you to https://airwhanganui.co.nz/ and Tīra for sponsoring our organisation!#postnataldepression #antenataldepression #suicide

Suicide is the leading cause of death during pregnancy and the postnatal period, and Māori women are three times more likely to die this way, a new report has found.

"Up to half of all birthing parents experience symptoms of perinatal distress and this has long-lasting consequences," report author Holly Walker said.

Walker said stress, anxiety, and depression has long-lasting consequences for both parents and babies.

"Having a parent in distress can also cause serious detrimental impacts for babies that can hinder their cognitive, emotional, and physiological development".

"The evidence indicates that support works best when it comes from sources that parents already know and trust, and that community-led and kaupapa Māori driven initiatives can be especially effective."

"This would help break the cycle of intergenerational disadvantage."

If you or someone you know is pregnant or expecting a child, visit pmgt.org.nz/mental-health/#Depression for information on postnatal depression and how to seek help.

Article by RNZ

Thank you to airwhanganui.co.nz/ and Tīra for sponsoring our organisation!

#postnataldepression #antenataldepression #suicide
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Police Remembrance Day is held every year on 29 September.

A national Service is held to honour Police colleagues in New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific, who have been killed by criminal acts while performing their official duties, or died as a result of their duties, as well as serving, retired and former New Zealand Police staff who have passed away in the preceding 12 months.

Police officers killed by criminal acts while performing their official duties are remembered in the Roll of Honour read out at each Service. Their service and commitment to the New Zealand Police are remembered and honoured.

The Police Remembrance huia pin can be worn in the week leading up to and on Police Remembrance Day and in the days before and the day of a Police funeral. The pin should be worn on the left lapel or left-hand side above any medals.

The tail plumage of the now lost huia bird is something rare and special. Considered ‘tapu’ or sacred by Māori, it is an immense honour to wear a huia tail feather as ornamentation. In the design, the incorporation of the NZ Police chevron into the huia tail feather, with a nick at the top signifying loss, symbolises the great honour and loss of someone special to the police.

The pin is attached to a card-carrying the Māori words: Huia e! Huia tangata kotahi. He tōtara kua hinga. This translates to the feather of the huia, for someone special. One dearly departed.

When purchasing a pin, donations are made that go to the Police Families Charitable Trust for the families of New Zealand police officers who have been killed or injured while carrying out their duties.

#nzpoliceremembranceday2022 #policeremembranceday2022 #nationalremembranceday2022
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Kiwis addicted to methamphetamine could be given a substitute drug to help get their lives back on track if recommendations from a new report are acted upon.The Helen Clark Foundation and NZ Drug Foundation report out earlier this month recommended setting up a pilot programme that would give either a substitute stimulant or controlled doses of meth to those having extra trouble escaping their addiction.These would be given under supervision and only in limited circumstances, such as to people whove remained addicted after two rounds of traditional treatment.The treatment could also reduce cravings and allow people to get away from the crime and toxic situations associated with meths illegal supply, she said.It comes as meth has grown into the nations most feared and stigmatised drug over the past 20 years.Meth has had an especially severe impact on poorer communities with wastewater testing showing the highest per capita usage in rural towns in Northland, Bay of Plenty, and Hawkes Bay.In one example in the Bay of Plentys Kawerau in 2019, police identified 600 people out of a population of 6000 using the drug, the report said.Māori are also using and being criminalised for meth use at a higher rate than non-Māori.Some addicts said they spent up to $1000 a week. Tests on wastewater suggested Kiwis spent $1.4m on meth every day.For information on methamphetamine, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/drug-abuse/#MethamphetamineNeed support with drug abuse from proffesionals? Visit https://pmgt.org.nz/directory/#drugs-&-alcohol-directoryArticle by NZ HeraldThank you to RSA Whakatane and http://www.acrow.co.nz for sponsoring our organisation!#helenclarkfoundation #nzdrugfoundation #drugusers

Kiwis addicted to methamphetamine could be given a substitute drug to help get their lives back on track if recommendations from a new report are acted upon.

The Helen Clark Foundation and NZ Drug Foundation report out earlier this month recommended setting up a pilot programme that would give either a substitute stimulant or controlled doses of meth to those having extra trouble escaping their addiction.

These would be given under supervision and only in limited circumstances, such as to people who've remained addicted after two rounds of traditional treatment.

The treatment could also reduce cravings and allow people to get away from the crime and "toxic" situations associated with meth's illegal supply, she said.

It comes as meth has grown into the nation's most feared and stigmatised drug over the past 20 years.

Meth has had an especially severe impact on poorer communities with wastewater testing showing the highest per capita usage in rural towns in Northland, Bay of Plenty, and Hawkes Bay.

In one example in the Bay of Plenty's Kawerau in 2019, police identified 600 people out of a population of 6000 using the drug, the report said.

Māori are also using and being "criminalised" for meth use at a higher rate than non-Māori.

Some addicts said they spent up to $1000 a week. Tests on wastewater suggested Kiwis spent $1.4m on meth every day.

For information on methamphetamine, visit pmgt.org.nz/drug-abuse/#Methamphetamine

Need support with drug abuse from proffesionals? Visit pmgt.org.nz/directory/#drugs-&-alcohol-directory

Article by NZ Herald

Thank you to RSA Whakatane and www.acrow.co.nz for sponsoring our organisation!

#helenclarkfoundation #nzdrugfoundation #drugusers
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Support #nzdrugfoundation

It would be great to see a programme implemented to assist with the reduction of meth use. There are medications currently available from a GP to support people with this process, but often the side effects are unpleasant.

The stats quoted on the quantities and the $ values are outstanding. I hope that people take up the program that is offered and people support them to stick to the program and to make change.

Pleased to hear this....well overdue, but great news...

Research shows that nearly one fifth of Australian employees had gone to work while drunk or tipsy and a similar number had taken a sickie because of drinking. How does New Zealand compare?Workplace drug testing gets a fair amount of media coverage, but there is a potentially far larger issue that employers need to be aware of – alcohol.Statistics show that 20.4% of the adult working population in New Zealand has a “hazardous drinking pattern” – defined as an established drinking pattern that carries a risk of harming a person’s physical or mental health, or having harmful social effects on the drinker or others.On average, 10 staff in an organisation of 50 will be hazardous drinkers. Alcohol is recognised as the country’s most widely used drug in the workforce, and the drug with the largest negative impact on workplace performance and safety.Collins said studies showed that a blood alcohol concentration of 0.09, nearly double the legal driving limit of 0.05, caused a massive drop-off in cognitive skills and huge variations with regards to motor skills.“If you’re in a factory doing some assembly, there are big error rates that can occur. Or if you’re a manager doing cognitive work, you can make poor judgements. You might not feel over the limit or under the weather, but cognitively and motor skills-wise, you can actually be quite impacted.”Are your employees up to speed with the company’s drug and alcohol policy?For tips on supporting employees in the workplace, visit https://www.drugfoundation.org.nz/info/at-work/supporting-employees/To learn the signs of alcohol abuse, visit https://pmgt.org.nz/alcohol-abuse/#Signs-of-alcohol-abuseThank you to http://www.bio-strategy.com and Flaxmere Pharmacy for sponsoring our organisation!Research shows that nearly one-fifth of Australian employees had gone to work while drunk or tipsy and a similar number had taken a sickie because of drinking. How does New Zealand compare?rson’s physical or mental health or having harmful social effects on the drinker or others.impacted.”

Research shows that nearly one fifth of Australian employees had gone to work while drunk or tipsy and a similar number had taken a sickie because of drinking. How does New Zealand compare?

Workplace drug testing gets a fair amount of media coverage, but there is a potentially far larger issue that employers need to be aware of – alcohol.

Statistics show that 20.4% of the adult working population in New Zealand has a “hazardous drinking pattern” – defined as an established drinking pattern that carries a risk of harming a person’s physical or mental health, or having harmful social effects on the drinker or others.

On average, 10 staff in an organisation of 50 will be hazardous drinkers. Alcohol is recognised as the country’s most widely used drug in the workforce, and the drug with the largest negative impact on workplace performance and safety.

Collins said studies showed that a blood alcohol concentration of 0.09, nearly double the legal driving limit of 0.05, caused a massive drop-off in cognitive skills and huge variations with regards to motor skills.

“If you’re in a factory doing some assembly, there are big error rates that can occur. Or if you’re a manager doing cognitive work, you can make poor judgements. You might not feel over the limit or under the weather, but cognitively and motor skills-wise, you can actually be quite impacted.”

Are your employees up to speed with the company’s drug and alcohol policy?

For tips on supporting employees in the workplace, visit www.drugfoundation.org.nz/info/at-work/supporting-employees/

To learn the signs of alcohol abuse, visit pmgt.org.nz/alcohol-abuse/#Signs-of-alcohol-abuse

Thank you to www.bio-strategy.com and Flaxmere Pharmacy for sponsoring our organisation!

Research shows that nearly one-fifth of Australian employees had gone to work while drunk or tipsy and a similar number had taken a sickie because of drinking. How does New Zealand compare?rson’s physical or mental health or having harmful social effects on the drinker or others.impacted.”
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And people think that drinking alcohol is harmless, the cost of this is not factored into the cost to society of alcohol consumption. The more I see of the effects alcohol imposes on society the more I realize that the crusade against smoking was against the lesser of the two evils.

Kava is another substance becoming more common, and evades the breathaliser.

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